Healthcare Associated Infections

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Likelihood of Complications for Hip and Knee Total Replacement Surgeries

The Hip and Knee Total Replacement Complication Rate compares the hospitals performance against all hospitals for common complications: acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pneumonia, or sepsis/septicemia/ shock; surgical site bleeding, pulmonary embolism, death, mechanical complication or periprosthetic joint infection/wound infection for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 or older who were electively admitted.*

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

Rate of Complications for Hip and Knee Total Replacement Surgeries

Worse than the U.S. National Rate

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Too Few Cases

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

No Different than the U.S. National Average

 No Different than the U.S. National Average No Different than the U.S. National Average  Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame  Too Few Cases

 

Likelihood of serious Surgical Complications (PSI-90)

Based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), this complication measure  is based on how often adult patients had certain serious, but potentially preventable, complications related to medical or surgical inpatient hospital care. This composite or summary measure is based on the following measures for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries:

  • Collapsed lung that results from medical treatment (Iatrogenic pneumothorax)
  • Blood clots, in the lung or a large vein, after surgery (Postoperatie Pulmonary Embolism or Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Rate)
  • Accidental cuts and tears
  • A wound that splits open after surgery (Postoperative wound dehiscence)
  • Pressure sores (Pressure ulcers)
  • Infections from large venous catheters (Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection rate)
  • Broken hip from a fall after surgery (Postoperative hip fracture rate)
  • Blood stream infection after surgery (Postoperative sepsis)

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

Rate of Complications for Hip and Knee Total Replacement Surgeries

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average No Different than the U.S. National Average No Different than the U.S. National Average No Different than the U.S. National Average

 

Death among patients with serious treatable complications after surgery

Data is based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ, Patient Safety Indicator#4 (PSIs) for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

Surgical Complications

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

 

Central Line Associate Bloodstream Infections

A central line is a narrow tube inserted by a doctor into a large vein of a patient's neck or chest to give important medical treatment. When not put in correctly or kept clean, central lines can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the blood. These infections are called central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), and they can be deadly. CLABSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure shows how often patients in a particular hospital contract certain infections during the course of their medical treatment, when compared to like hospitals.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

CLABSI

Better than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital for this time frame

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

 

Catheter Associate Urinary Tract infections

A catheter is a drainage tube that is inserted by a doctor into a patient’s urinary bladder through the urethra and is left in place to collect urine while a patient is immobile or incontinent. When not put in correctly or kept clean, or if left in place for long periods of time, catheters can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the urinary tract. These infections are called catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), and they can cause additional illness or be deadly. CAUTIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure shows how often patients in a particular hospital contract certain infections during the course of their medical treatment, when compared to like hospitals.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

CAUTI

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

No Different than the U.S. National Average

 

Surgical Site infections from Colon Surgeries

A surgical operative procedure is one that is performed on a patient in an operating room where a surgeon makes at least one incision through the skin or mucous membrane to give important medical treatment. When not conducted in a sterile environment and following sterile procedures, a surgical site can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in a patient, which can affect the skin, tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. These infections are called Surgical Site Infections (SSIs), and they can be deadly. SSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure shows how often patients in a particular hospital contract certain infections during the course of their medical treatment, when compared to like hospitals.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

Colon SSI

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

 

Surgical Site Infections from Abdominal Hysterectomies

A surgical operative procedure is one that is performed on a patient in an operating room where a surgeon makes at least one incision through the skin or mucous membrane to give important medical treatment. When not conducted in a sterile environment and following sterile procedures, a surgical site can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in a patient, which can affect the skin, tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. These infections are called Surgical Site Infections (SSIs), and they can be deadly. SSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure shows how often patients in a particular hospital contract certain infections during the course of their medical treatment, when compared to like hospitals.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

Abdominal Hysterectomy SSI

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

 

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics. MRSA infections in the blood stream can be acquired in hospital setings, and may cause severe of life-threatening symptoms. This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure compares the number of MRSA-postive blood specimens collected four or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

MRSA

No Different than the U.S. National Average

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

Not Applicable to this hospital

 

Clostridium Difficile

Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) is a type of bacteria that causes inflammation of the colon. C. Diff. infection can cause severe diarrhea, fever, appetite loss, nausea and abdominal pain.

This CMS Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measure compares the number of stool specimens that tested positive for C. Diff. toxin four or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.

*www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare

 

 

 

 

C. Diff.

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

No Different than the U.S. National Average

* National average, state average, MSHA and facility data are for the period from April 2012 - March 2013.   The national average and state average data are provided by Hospital Compare, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services which reports results from hospitals submitting data to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). UCMH (Unicoi County Memorial Hospital) is a newly added hospital to MSHA and their scores are not calculated in the health system’s composite score at this time.)