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 Left-Side Brain Injury

 What May Happen:

 

  

SAFETY

  • May be anxious
  • May become upset when she or he can't do things right

COMMUNICATION

  • May answer "yes" or "yeah" to every question, or "no" to every question
  • May not be able to understand what is said or what is written
  • If more than one language is spoken, she or he may only understand the first language learned
  • May not be able to recognize numbers, but able to tell time
  • May have dysarthria (slurred speech)
How to Help: 

SAFETY

  • Never allow anyone to pull on the right arm when moving the person
  • Allow the person to take as much time as needed to complete a task; don't rush
  • Don't ask a lot of questions, because he or she may become anxious or frustrated when unable to answer
  • Give the person plenty of time to answer the questions you do ask

COMMUNICATION

  • Family, friends and healthcare personnel should all use the same, simple directions and use pantomime (like the game of charades) to tell the person what you want him or her to do, or what you are going to do
  • Speak slowly, clearly and face the person as you speak
  • Reduce noise and other distractions; turn off the TV or music, only one person talk at a time
  • Allow plenty of time for the brain to process a question or direction

MOVEMENT AND FEELING

  • Family and friends can assist by helping with the exercise program given by the occupational therapist, physical therapist and speech therapist several times during the day. Be sure to support the joints: don't hold the wrist to move the arm-hold at the elbow and wrist. Don't hold the ankle, but hold the knee and ankle. The therapists will show you how.
  • Feeling can come back if it is absent, or settle down if it is tingling. Rub the arm or leg with lotion, with a warm cloth, a cool cloth, a cotton ball or piece of gauze for a few minutes several times a day. Stop if it seems to bother him or her.